What is the Cost of Methadone Treatment?

Posted on :  May 23rd, 2017  |  By :  towardsrecovery

Are you aware that there are over 50,000 people on the methadone maintenance treatment in Ontario alone? This is according to a paper that appeared in the Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention and Policy medical journal. What is the cost of this treatment to the public payer in Canada? Let’s try and see.

Importance of Price Quotes

Why is it necessary to have methadone treatment quotes? The estimate of the cost of the methadone treatment in Canada or anywhere else for that matter will serve as a guide in crafting policies that will cover healthcare financing decisions.

The estimates are commonly compared to those of other countries but not necessarily applicable to Canada because of a variety of reasons. For example, the quotes from other countries may include expenses that are not applicable to the Canadian perspective. The application of the fees of pharmacies, laboratory services, and physicians may also vary including the prevailing guidelines and programs of the respective governments.

The treatment guidelines also have to be taken into account because obviously the allowed frequency of visits will have an impact on the overall cost of the treatment. For the Canadian perspective, it is best to look at the cost estimate for the treatment of the opiate dependent user from the public payer perspective.

Based on treatment figures, the average daily cost is around $15.48 per patient. If the patient opts to go with continuous treatment for at least a year, the estimated cost will be $5,651. These figures reveal that the delivery of methadone treatment in Ontario in particular is within the same levels as those of Australia and the United States.

Comparing Cost Estimates

There will definitely be a variance in the implementation of methadone treatment. Costing studies conducted in Europe revealed that in the United Kingdom, the approximate cost of treatment is $3 but rises to $12 daily in Norway. These figures however were based on an earlier study conducted in 2010.

During the same period, the cost of methadone maintenance treatment in Australia was around $11 a day. This costs Australian prisons an estimated $3,234 per year per patient. Based on a cost-effectiveness analysis conducted between methadone and buprenorphine, the methadone treatment was cheaper by about $6 per day per patient.

Even within the same country, a comparison of cost estimates will show that the methadone treatment quotes vary. In the United States for example, the Veteran’s Affairs estimates the cost of treatment at $5,250 per year, while other programs showed an annual cost of only $4,176. The cost per week of the treatment would range anywhere from $42 to as much as $139. In New York, the average annual cost is pegged from $4,750 to $6,068.

When we take into account the number of patients that have been stabilized in a period of at least a year, the estimated cost for the clinic-based methadone treatment comes out at $240 a week while the office-based methadone treatment cost is at $275 weekly.

All of these estimates can serve as a baseline reference. The manner of treatment for methadone will also have an impact on future estimates. For example, in Canada methadone is classified as a controlled substance so it requires a prescription from a physician. The physician who will write a prescription will also have to undergo a specialized training program aside from an exemption issued by Health Canada.

There is also the factor of licensing bodies in every province that are tasked with the regulation of the prescription of methadone. The guidelines from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario is normally used as a standard. These guidelines outline the appropriate testing, prescribing, and dispensing of methadone including other factors that can affect the treatment.

If you want to get more accurate methadone treatment quotes, call the Towards Recovery Clinics now.

Who We Serve ?

  • Individuals using/abusing street narcotics (e.g. heroin).
  • Patients abusing prescription narcotics(i.e., Codeine, Talwin, Percocet/Percodan, Dilaudid, Morphine or Demerol, et cetera).
  • Individuals displaying any of the following behaviours: Compulsive drug use or drug seeking/craving.