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Addiction and Crime

Posted on :  June 30th, 2014  |  By :  towardsrecovery

One thing that can function as a barrier to recovery from addiction is the old adage that addiction is not inherently bad – indeed, as an end in and of itself, and with no consideration for its impact on the addict’s behavior, addiction is a morally neutral phenomenon, unless the substance in question is illegal, that is.

Of course, we know that addiction cannot be isolated in this way and anyone who’s ever suffered with it, or their loved ones, will know that any behavior which compels an individual to feel desperation will have consequences that reach far beyond the individual themselves.

“This truth is best represented by the relationship between addiction and crime.”

There are numerous ways that these two interact with one another, but the three main ways in which this union plays out are as follows:

  • Charges related to the possession, distribution or production of illegal drugs, which are known as “Alcohol and Drug Defined” charges
  • Charges related to any illegal or disorderly behavior that comes about as a direct result of being under the influence of drugs or alcohol, which are known as “Alcohol and Drug Related” charges
  • Charges related to being involved in situations that encourage or cultivate illegal behavior and activities, which are known as “Alcohol and Drug Using Lifestyle” charges

Why do so many addicts engage in illegal behavior?

For a non-addict, or from the perspective of someone who has never experienced addiction first-hand before, the illegal behavior of addicts can look downright irrational – why would an addict possibly risk something with such potentially devastating consequences for something as small and insignificant as an alcoholic beverage?

Of course, in reality, the choice to engage in such behavior is irrational, but in the eyes of a desperate addict in search of their next fix, the pros of acquiring their chosen vice far outweigh the potential risks.

Consider the starving mother who steals a loaf of bread to feed herself and her family – for our purposes, a desperate addict is this mother, in that the psychological state is the same.

What’s the solution?

Given the statistics on drug addicts who are already well within the prison system, we know for a fact that this kind of retribution doesn’t do much to tackle the real, underlying problem i.e. the addiction itself.

As a result, it’s important to look to other solutions, among them support groups, rehabilitation programs and other forms of addiction treatment and therapy.

If you or someone you know could benefit from something like this, and live in or around Hamilton, St. Catharines, or Brantford, Ontario, don’t hesitate to get in touch with Towards Recovery on 519-579-0589 to locate your nearest clinic and kick start your journey.

Make sure you have an unexpired OHIP card or call 1-866-532-3161 to find out how to get one.


Why We Need to Understand Addiction

Posted on :  June 27th, 2014  |  By :  towardsrecovery

A central aspect of conquering addiction involves understanding it – both in terms of its personal effects on the individual’s particular life, and its seemingly impenetrable grasp on the brain.

Understanding the factors that allow addiction to develop and sustain itself will allow the individual to find the means by which to break those bonds and in turn, end the destructive cycle addiction can have on one’s life.

What addiction is not

Sufferers of addiction can often feel great guilt upon self-reflection, leaving them in a vulnerable position where that addiction is concerned.

This is because many people still hold the view that addiction is within the control of the sufferer, such that the problem is entirely self-created and the resulting complications are controllable and it is within the power of the addict to stop.

While it is true that the addict themselves are ultimately responsible for making the decision to approach recovery, those who suffer from addiction are not also suffering from moral or willpower deficits.

What addiction is

Addiction, instead, can best be understood with a brief etymology lesson. “Addiction”, as a term, comes from the Latin for “enslaved by” or “bound to”, which tells you much of what you need to know: addiction is a compulsion – something the sufferer has little power over to change.

Addiction, in all forms, works on the same principle: the abuse of something x releases dopamine in the user, thereby triggering a reward correlation.

The user learns that using x correlates to a reward in the form of dopamine, thereby encouraging future use.

This repeated release of dopamine can lead to a situation in which the addict conflates the reasonable expectation of reward in exchange for using x with the desire to use x.

While this basic reward system can apply to addicts and non-addicts alike, the build up of tolerance to x usually results in exponentially increasing desires for x, which slowly cross the line between desire and compulsion. This is where addiction sets in.

Breaking the cycle

Conquering addiction, then, requires breaking the reward cycle the user has conditioned themselves into chasing.

“The best way to do this is by thinking of addiction as a super-strength habit.”

By replacing the existing habit with new, healthy ones, which don’t interfere with other aspects of their life, and refusing themselves access to x, they create a new reward cycle which is overall more fulfilling and less disruptive.

If you, or someone you know, needs help to recover from drug addiction, or you’d like like to learn more about the nature of addiction, and live in or around Hamilton, St. Catharines, or Brantford, Ontario, don’t hesitate to get in touch with Towards Recovery on 519-579-0589 to locate your nearest clinic and kick start your journey.

Make sure you have an unexpired OHIP card or call 1-866-532-3161 to find out how to get one.

Towards Recovery Clinics Inc. (TRC) is an Ontario addiction treatment centre with the philosophy to help individuals take control of their addiction and help them rebuild their lives and careers.

Don’t hesitate to call us! We’ll be happy to help you.


Why Philip Seymour Hoffman’s Death Is So Scary

Posted on :  June 26th, 2014  |  By :  towardsrecovery

For many of his fans, Philip Seymour Hoffman was one of the most talented actors among his generation, having been nominated for four Oscars, and winning one, and maintaining a successful family life, fathering three children.

His addiction history, though private to many, was just that: his history. At the age of 22, he recovered successfully from addiction and for 23 years in total, managed to resist the urge to use anything.

Tragically, however, his life came to an end earlier this year, just two years after he decided to use prescription pills again in a highly publicized incident.

As a tale, it’s undeniably a sad one – but it’s also one that we can learn from, as it points to some interesting and telling truths about the nature of addiction.

“Recovery is not a process with a clearly-defined finish line, and addiction can beget further addictions.”

Why the science around addiction is so vague

It’s a truth universally acknowledged by addicts and industry professionals alike that the root cause of addiction has thus far largely eluded science’s vice-like grip.

While we know that some people may be more prone than others, we know little about identifying the genetic factors that contribute to these predispositions, and indeed, whether a propensity for future drug addiction can be a hereditary characteristic.

In order to know how to treat a problem, you need to identify its cause, and herein lies the second problem: statistics on recovery programs are also, worryingly vague.

This is partly because alcoholics anonymous, perhaps the most largely known recovery program around, respects the anonymity of its members so thoroughly that finding information on its success rates is tricky.

Despite this, there are things we can count as knowledge in relation to addiction and recovery, and Hoffman’s tragic and untimely death illustrates them rather well.

What we can learn from Philip Seymour Hoffman

There’s a reason so many people involved in addiction and the recovery process throw around that old caveat “it’s a journey, not a destination” so often. This is because it’s true.

While some people successfully avoid relapse throughout their recovery, many more acknowledge that relapse is an often unavoidable part of the process, and indeed, something that can be triggered by things that seem worlds away from whatever it was that initially hooked the addict.

While Hoffman’s death should function as a warning to all recovering addicts, it should also be something that we all learn from, and a means of illustrating the truth that the recovery process is a long, often difficult road, but is one that is well worth the effort.

If you, or someone you know, needs help to recover from drug addiction, and live in or around Hamilton, St. Catharines, or Brantford, Ontario, don’t hesitate to get in touch with Towards Recovery on 519-579-0589 to locate your nearest clinic and kick start your journey.

Make sure you have an unexpired OHIP card or call 1-866-532-3161 to find out how to get one.

Towards Recovery Clinics Inc. (TRC) is an Ontario addiction treatment centre with the philosophy to help individuals take control of their addiction and help them rebuild their lives and careers.

Don’t hesitate to call us! We’ll be happy to help you.


Tips for a successful rehab

Posted on :  June 26th, 2014  |  By :  towardsrecovery

As corny as it sounds, anyone who is actively looking to rehabilitate their lives and recover fully from addiction ought to be congratulated for making the first step towards a much brighter future. In short, from here, the only way is up.

That said, recovering from addiction is not easy, and many find that a rehab program is a great way to keep themselves on target.

Not all rehab programs are created equally, however, and without active participation and the right mindset, some will find their journey more of a struggle than others.

In order to get the most out of your rehab experience, here are some tips for a successful rehab.

Find the right program for you

Rehab programs should not operate a one size fits all model. After all, every addict is different, and what works beautifully for some may not work for you.

As a result, it’s important to do your research. Look at the methodologies out there – which ones look the most suitable for you? There’s a lot out there, and some methods have proven more universally successful than others, such as AA’s 12 step program.

Whichever methodology appeals most to you, be prepared to throw yourself in head first and don’t pick one that you’re not enthusiastic about.

Plan your move

When you’ve made your decision about a particular rehab program, you’ll be given a package that should cover everything you’ll need to expect, including a guide on what to bring and what not to bring.

Focus on comfort: you’ll want things that remind you of home, and things that make you feel yourself while you’re there. Do not, under any circumstances, bring anything that is not allowed.

Some programs prohibit certain items that others do not – for example, iPads and other devices. If this is a deal breaker for you, make sure you ask about this when you’re selecting the right program.

Apart from that, bring other means of entertainment – books, journals, sketchbooks etc.

Prepare to participate fully

“Some people go to rehab reluctantly, while others are desperate to be rid of their addiction.”

Either way, you’re much more likely to get the most out of the whole experience by throwing yourself into it, and being sure to try everything on offer, as well as making sure that you participate fully in group events, and really engage with other residents, and counselors.

Commit to aftercare

Rehab is not a fix all, and without sufficient aftercare and a committed, realistic mindset, it’s not likely to do much good.

Prepare yourself for the long, but incredibly rewarding journey ahead of you, and don’t ditch maintenance because you think you’re cured.

If you, or someone you know, needs help to recover from drug addiction, and live in or around Hamilton, St. Catharines, or Brantford, Ontario, don’t hesitate to get in touch with Towards Recovery on 519-579-0589 to locate your nearest clinic and kick start your journey.

Make sure you have an unexpired OHIP card or call 1-866-532-3161 to find out how to get one.

Towards Recovery Clinics Inc. (TRC) is an Ontario addiction treatment centre with the philosophy to help individuals take control of their addiction and help them rebuild their lives and careers.

Don’t hesitate to call us! We’ll be happy to help you.


Alcohol Addiction Self-Help

Posted on :  June 23rd, 2014  |  By :  towardsrecovery

Recovery from addiction, particularly where a socially acceptable substance such as alcohol is involved, can take time and perseverance, and embarking on it at your own pace is a vital part of successful recovery.

As a result, many find that the best way to start is small: by implementing baby steps by themselves, before seeking professional help.

Formal treatment is improved by the right mindset and some of these tips can help to cultivate the right mindset, so they’re a great place to start.

Getting started

“Working towards recovery all begins with reflection.”

Most people who begin to consider the possibility that they may have a problem will be in two minds: on the one hand, they may recognize the detrimental impact it’s having on the rest of their lives, but on the other, they still exhibit dependent behaviors and have the physical addiction based around the idea of reward through the release of dopamine.

“The first step is always to rid yourself of any residual denial.”

The best way to do this is by listing the pros and cons of carrying on with the addiction (with the knowledge that addictions tend to get worse if left alone, and never get better.)

Things to consider include:

  • Is it affecting your relationships?
  • Is it having an adverse effect on your health?
  • Is it having an impact on your work performance?
  • Is it costing you significant portions of your money?
  • Is it filling some other gap in your life? (e.g. productive hobbies, relationships, interests etc.)

Making changes

If you’ve decided you need to take action, then the next step is to begin formulating habitual changes that you can implement across all aspects of your life.

Start by setting goals – do you want to cut down, or cut alcohol out completely? Or, do you want to cut it out completely, but begin by cutting down? Either way, here are some simple changes you can make to work towards these goals:

  • Inform loved ones about your goals, so they can help you stick to them
  • Remove yourself from temptation, whether this be a matter of removing alcohol’s presence from your home, or not allowing yourself to visit situations in which you would previously drink
  • Stay away from those who reinforce bad behaviors
  • Keep a drinking diary so that you know how much you’re drinking
  • If you do drink, implement controlled drinking by doing it very slowly, or introducing water rules to accompany alcohol
  • Have sober days where you do not permit yourself to drink at all

Once you’ve successfully implemented these changes, you may find you don’t need additional help. However, if you do, you’re likely to be in the ideal mindset for professional assistance.

If you’re interested in learning more about yourself, and your own addiction, and live in or around Hamilton, St. Catharines, or Brantford, Ontario, don’t hesitate to get in touch with Towards Recovery on 519-579-0589 to locate your nearest clinic and kick start your journey.

Make sure you have an unexpired OHIP card or call 1-866-532-3161 to find out how to get one.

Towards Recovery Clinics Inc. (TRC) is an Ontario addiction treatment centre with the philosophy to help individuals take control of their addiction and help them rebuild their lives and careers.

Don’t hesitate to call us! We’ll be happy to help you.


Why Some People Are Drug Addicts

Posted on :  June 20th, 2014  |  By :  towardsrecovery

A big part of working with recovery as your goal is understanding the root cause of the addiction in the first place.

It can be easy to pinpoint the blame in one area only, and this kind of addiction sourcing can leave sufferers feeling guilty and confused.

Furthermore, recent research also suggests that traditional theories may be incorrect, neglecting the widely-seen truth that some people are more vulnerable to the lures of addiction than others.

The most plausible candidates for explaining the addiction phenomenon are known as the disease theory, and learned theory, respectively.

In this article, we’ll examine both in the hopes that they may shed light on the process of addiction, and recovery from it.

The Disease Theory

The disease theory of addiction is fairly self-explanatory, treating addiction as a biologically disorder, an illness that controls impulses and manifests as an overarching desire for one or more particular thing/s.

This theory, in fact, is one maintained and acted upon by Alcoholics Anonymous who, as an organization, focus on the journey to independence as akin to recovering from a biological disorder.

This theory also points to a potential, if not yet actualized, future solution: a form of medication that can remove the impulse that generates the addiction.

The Learned Theory

Conversely, the learned theory of addiction stipulates that addictive behaviors are reinforced by sociological and psychological factors.

In this way, drug addiction is caused by a reward system. Neuroscience shows that drugs trigger the release of dopamine in the brain, which is the primary cause of reward-seeking behaviors, such as drug taking.

The learned theory is also backed up by numerous experiments in which many animals will perform tasks in pursuit of rewards.

Why are some more likely to get addicted than others?

Given, then, that most addictive behaviors are in pursuit of reward in the form of dopamine release, why are some people more at risk of addiction than others?

In the most basic terms, there are two correlative reasons for this.

“For a start, many long term addicts will have severely depleted levels of existing dopamine.”

This is because overstimulation can reduce the levels and nothing overstimulates dopamine receptors quite like long term drug use.

Furthermore, however, research has suggested that many addicts may have had dopamine deficiencies before they ever began taking drugs, and so, had more difficulty experiencing pleasure in their lives.

This suggests that the solution may have to be maintenance-based, and perhaps, apply to everyone who has the increased potential to become addicts.

If you, or someone you know, needs help to recover from drug addiction, or you’d like like to learn more about who may be at risk, and live in or around Hamilton, St. Catharines, or Brantford, Ontario, don’t hesitate to get in touch with Towards Recovery on 519-579-0589 to locate your nearest clinic and kick start your journey.

Make sure you have an unexpired OHIP card or call 1-866-532-3161 to find out how to get one.

Towards Recovery Clinics Inc. (TRC) is an Ontario addiction treatment centre with the philosophy to help individuals take control of their addiction and help them rebuild their lives and careers.

Don’t hesitate to call us! We’ll be happy to help you.


All about Addiction: What You Need to Know

Posted on :  June 16th, 2014  |  By :  towardsrecovery

Addiction” is a word many are happy to throw around without much regard for its actual meaning and application.

As a result, it can be useful for you, if you happen to be suffering from addiction, or know someone who is, to have a reference overview of its hallmarks, causes, and the areas in which it can strike.

A key part of recovery revolves around understanding your affliction so here’s a quick fire fact sheet which aims to debunk some of the myths surrounding addiction.

What is it? What causes it?

Addiction is best thought of as a compulsion. Those who exhibit addictive behaviors may find themselves unable to control themselves or resist exposure to something.

Addiction can take two forms:

  • Substance Dependence: a self-created biological imperative, where the sufferer finds themselves with a substance dependence, which in turn will mean they are addicted to drugs or alcohol, for example.
  • Behavioral Addiction: a psychological dependence, where the sufferer may be drawn to specific activities, rather than substances. Famous common examples include gambling, sex, exercise etc.

Though superficially different, both forms of addiction yield the same results: that the sufferer develops a need for the activity or drug such that they cannot function in daily life without it, and thus, their pursuit of it becomes uncontrolled and compulsive.

This fact sheet will concentrate mostly on physical dependence, as it is probably the most widespread form of addiction and perhaps unsurprisingly, also the most misunderstood.

The relationship between habit and addiction

For the most part, people are capable of engaging in certain activities (such as exercise) or use substances (such as alcohol) without the risk of it developing into a compulsion.

Others, however, may not be able to engage in such activities. The difference between these people can be highlighted with the habit-addiction distinction.

Where a habit represents engagement with an activity out of choice, addictive engagement represents a lack of choice: in other words, the sufferer is unable to control their actions.

While the causes of addiction are often disputed, they generally stem from a combination of physical predispositions, environmental influences and emotional states.

“One thing that is for sure, though, is that addictive behaviors will not go away on their own.”

Addiction leads to a higher tolerance, and an increased quantity of engagement with the substance or activity in order to feel satisfied.

What to look out for

If you worry that you, or someone you love, may be suffering from addiction, here’s what to look out for:

  • An inability to stop
  • Withdrawal symptoms
  • Appetite increase
  • Increased solitude
  • Interpersonal problems
  • Substance use as a response to interpersonal problems
  • Denial
  • Sacrifice of social activities
  • Financial problems

If any of these symptoms sound familiar and you’d like to find out more, and live in or around Hamilton, St. Catharines, or Brantford, Ontario, don’t hesitate to get in touch with Towards Recovery on 519-579-0589 to locate your nearest clinic and kick start your journey.

Make sure you have an unexpired OHIP card or call 1-866-532-3161 to find out how to get one.

Towards Recovery Clinics Inc. (TRC) is an Ontario addiction treatment centre with the philosophy to help individuals take control of their addiction and help them rebuild their lives and careers.

Don’t hesitate to call us! We’ll be happy to help you.


Self-Help Groups for Alcohol Addiction

Posted on :  June 13th, 2014  |  By :  towardsrecovery

Because addiction is often such an isolating process, support groups are one of the enduring aspects of the treatment process the world over.

A sense of community with individuals who can connect with you directly is a great way to facilitate the journey to recovery and can help sufferers remain positive and on track.

Knowing a little about the resources available to you can help you make informed decisions when you decide that a group should function as a key part of your treatment.

Here are some of the most well known self help groups for the treatment of alcohol addiction.

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)

Perhaps the most famous of all self help groups for alcohol addiction is alcoholics anonymous, a worldwide organization who work on a program based around 12 disparate but progressive steps which are designed to lead the participant to complete abstinence from alcohol long term.

They meet several times a week and operate an optional attendance system, where members can attend as and when they like, meaning it can be integrated into all routines. Members pick a sponsor, an ex-addict, who is there to keep the member on track. The 12 steps involve:

  • Coming to terms with your addiction, and ridding yourself of denial
  • Considering the impact your addiction has had on your past actions and mistakes
  • Redeeming yourself by making amends for past wrongs
  • Helping those earlier on in their journey to sobriety

Secular Organizations for Sobriety (SOS)

Secular Organizations for Sobriety (SOS) works on a slightly different principle to AA, in that it emphasizes a more science-based, less spiritual journey to abstinence.

In contrast to AA, SOS removes the spiritual content prevalent in AA and replaces it with an increased accentuation of self-empowerment and the strength of the individual in steering their own way to freedom from addiction.

Rather than redistributing the strength for recovery away from the individual and into the hands of a higher power, SOS works on the principle that the power can only come from the sufferer.

Self-management and Recovery Training (SMART)

Self-management and Recovery Training (SMART) works much like traditional cognitive behavioral therapy, and works on the principle that breaking an addictive cycle requires substantial, but gradual, behavioral changes.

SMART is particularly suited to those who respond well to regimented plans, as it aims to provide the recovering addict with actionable techniques and tools with which to combat all stages of recovery.

Of course, AA, SOS and SMART only represent a tiny portion of the self help peer groups available out there, but they can all offer programs that can adapt to the particular needs of the individual, making them some of the most successful.

If you’d like more information about the options available to you as an alcoholic, and live in or around Hamilton, St. Catharines, or Brantford, Ontario, don’t hesitate to get in touch with Towards Recovery on 519-579-0589 to locate your nearest clinic and kick start your journey.

Make sure you have an unexpired OHIP card or call 1-866-532-3161 to find out how to get one.

Towards Recovery Clinics Inc. (TRC) is an Ontario addiction treatment centre with the philosophy to help individuals take control of their addiction and help them rebuild their lives and careers.

Don’t hesitate to call us! We’ll be happy to help you.


5 Ways to Avoid Addiction Relapse

Posted on :  April 21st, 2014  |  By :  towardsrecovery

Any good addiction treatment program will not only aid your journey through the tough early stages of recovery, but will also endeavor to provide you with the tools to manage your life after your detox program is complete.

This will include a tailored aftercare plan, and individualized tips designed to help you tackle that common recovery halter: relapse.

Recovering addicts respond differently to the world around them when they begin reintegrating into it, with some having to resist temptation at every corner, others remaining clean with relative ease, others suffering one substantial relapse, and others still suffering numerous relapses.

Relapsing is a common part of the recovery process, but it can be traumatic for the recovering addict. With that in mind, and since you never can be too prepared, here are five tips for avoiding addiction relapse.

Don’t test yourself

Many recovering addicts feel an overwhelming temptation to put their progress to the test, by spending time with people they associate with using, or in places where their drug of choice is easily accessible.

While this instinct is understandable, it’s not advisable to follow through. Similarly, try to keep your mood high – emotional tests can be just as risky as physical ones. You’ve been through a lot – don’t put yourself through more, even if you think you can overcome it.

Surround yourself with supportive people

One key aspect to changing your life after addiction demands that you let go of the people who facilitated your addiction.

Instead, you need to surround yourself with positive influencers who can provide you with a different environment which is symbolic of your new life, and give you a shoulder to lean on when you’re feeling tempted.

Put together a weekly itinerary

One of the reasons recovering addicts find their adjustment to post-detox life so difficult is that they can fill their days with dead time.

By creating a schedule that incorporates productive activities, fun, family time and recovery-related aftercare, you’re much more likely to keep yourself occupied and maintain the momentum you had during your program.

Stay motivated

Numerous recovering addicts find themselves approaching relapse when they lose their lust for recovery.

This is a common enough feeling – after all, approaching anything 10 weeks down the line with the same enthusiasm you did when you first started is tricky.

You can maintain motivation by continuing to attend meetings, or writing reminders to yourself – even telling yourself every day, out loud, why you’re doing this and how far you’ve come. Keep an eye on your progress and you’re more likely to stick with it.

Relapse is not the end

“Many recovering addicts fear that relapse signifies a return to square one. This is not true.”

It is a common part of the recovery process, and you need to tell yourself, if it does happen, that you’ve gotten very far before, and you can do it again. Always look forward and don’t berate yourself.

If you need further help with preventing relapse during recovery from addiction, and live in or around Hamilton, St. Catharines, or Brantford, Ontario, don’t hesitate to get in touch with Towards Recovery on 519-579-0589 to locate your nearest clinic and kick start your journey.

Towards Recovery Clinics Inc. (TRC) is an Ontario addiction treatment centre with the philosophy to help individuals take control of their addiction and help them rebuild their lives and careers.

Make sure you have an unexpired OHIP card or call 1-866-532-3161 to find out how to get one.


Attitude and Drug Addiction Recovery

Posted on :  April 20th, 2014  |  By :  towardsrecovery

Recovering from addiction requires changing large aspects of your life, and with these aspects, transforming your attitude towards it.

Establishing the right attitude for drug addiction recovery begins with adjusting your overall focus to your future.

Rather than focusing on what you’ll lose by taking the road to recovery, focus on what you’re going to gain and how much your life is going to improve.

How, then, should your attitude change to give yourself the best shot at a successful recovery? As already mentioned, your outlook must be fundamentally forward-looking. Here’s how to help yourself.

Don’t blame others

Focusing entirely on what got you into this situation by blaming either other people, or external factors such as a fundamental character trait is not the same as examining your behaviors in an attempt to identify possible risk factors in the future.

You need to take charge of your situation and look to the future. How are YOU going to change your situation? Where do YOU want to be in six months’ time? How are YOU going to get there?

Don’t resist change

“Convincing yourself that change can be resisted is a dangerous game.”

Rather, you need to acknowledge that your life needs to undergo a very necessary and very substantial transformation.

You do not have a choice – you have reached an impasse where extensive changes need to be made, so you can properly be on board, rather than constantly looking for alternatives. Focus is a must and resisting change can corrupt this focus.

Don’t do it for anyone else

Recovery from addiction is rarely likely to be successful if entered into entirely under the influence of the desires of another.

You need to be on board 100% in order to remain motivated and positive. You are doing this for you, and nobody else.

Look forward

It can be very tempting to focus entirely on what you’re set to lose from recovery – your drug-taking circle, the pleasure you got from drugs, time you’re spending in recovery – but think instead about your future.

There are, undeniably, things you’re set to lose through recovery, but some losses are not bad ones (such as an abusive spouse) and by focusing on your potential gains, you’re more likely to feel that the trade off is well worth the effort.

By succeeding in recovery, you’re likely to establish better personal relationships, think more clearly, feel better about yourself, function better in your life, and be much healthier.

One way to draw your attention to the future when you feel your focus slipping is by planning things that you want to do, whether that be taking up a new hobby, or starting a project, or rewarding yourself with something you’ve always wanted to do.

If you’re interested in learning more about yourself, and your own addiction, and live in or around Hamilton, St. Catharines, or Brantford, Ontario, don’t hesitate to get in touch with Towards Recovery on 519-579-0589 to locate your nearest clinic and kick start your journey.

Towards Recovery Clinics Inc. (TRC) is an Ontario addiction treatment centre with the philosophy to help individuals take control of their addiction and help them rebuild their lives and careers.

Make sure you have an unexpired OHIP card or call 1-866-532-3161 to find out how to get one.




Who We Serve ?

  • Individuals using/abusing street narcotics (e.g. heroin).
  • Patients abusing prescription narcotics(i.e., Codeine, Talwin, Percocet/Percodan, Dilaudid, Morphine or Demerol, et cetera).
  • Individuals displaying any of the following behaviours: Compulsive drug use or drug seeking/craving.
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